A Groom's Cake for a Summer Wedding
Theme:  Regina and Bill's wedding color was purple and the
name Regina means "queen," so we created a special
"Queen of Hearts" cake for their wedding.

We baked a lemon lavender pound cake and filled it with a
lemon curd (an English pudding). The cake was then
frosted with a citrus butter-cream frosting and covered with
marshmallow fondant. To make the design complete, we
added (edible) lavender and violet hearts made of fondant,
and adorned the top of the cake with a silver Wilton crown.
This page will display pictures, descriptions and testimonials for some of the
events we have catered.

  • Wedding and Specialty Cakes
  • Luncheons
  • Receptions
Wedding and Specialty Cakes



















Cooking is an element in Alice Dames' cornucopia of careers

BY JOE BONWICH • jbonwich@post-dispatch.com >  314-340-8133       | Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 12:00 am

If you meet Alice Dames and ask her what she does, set aside a little time for the answer.

"I'm a technical writer, I do technical training, I write videos, I do instructional design and I work with online help
systems. I've done business analysis as well," she says. Then, with her characteristic wry humor, she adds: "I also
sing, dance and do comedy."

But there's more: She and her husband, Todd Burton, run a small catering business. When technical writing and
catering aren't filling her time, she makes and sells elaborate beaded jewelry.

"I love to travel, but we haven't had much time to do that recently," she says with a further touch of sarcasm.

Her life may seem like a random collection of skills and avocations (she wasn't entirely kidding about the singing,
dancing and comedy), but Dames' background provides some clues as to how they tie together.

Writing is in her blood. Her mother, Joan Dames, is the retired longtime society columnist from the Post-Dispatch.
Almost since she was old enough to work, Alice Dames worked in restaurants, including classic St. Louis sites as the
Flaming Pit, and she majored in English and performing arts at St. Louis University.

She firmed up her technical credentials through a four-year stint with MCI, one of the boom-and-bust, post-AT&T-
breakup telecommunications companies. That led her to contract consulting and a variety of projects lasting from
several months to more than a year. She took a permanent position in 1998 as a senior editor at the Federal
Reserve Bank of St. Louis. After seven years, she returned to the consulting market.

"I'm better as a free agent," she says.

She's currently leading a project to build an online help system at Savvis Inc., the Town and Country-based firm that
specializes in information technology and Internet-cloud services.

Dames can draw a straight line from her performing-arts training to her consulting career.

"I can remember (SLU professors) Alan Hanson and Wayne Loui asking us over and over, 'What does the character
want? What will he or she do to get it?' There's a lot of that involved in consulting."

The affinity for beaded jewelry spun off of a consulting gig.

"I was in Seattle for a job and was at the Pike Place Market," she says. "I found some at a booth and just fell in love
with it."

As for the catering work, well after her early restaurant jobs, Dames became a regular chef for suppers of 40 to 70
guests at her church. The diners frequently told her that she should open a restaurant.

"People just don't understand the economics behind that, not to mention the horrendous hours," she says.

She and Burton, who had also worked at restaurants early in his career, started doing catering jobs on a limited
basis and continue when their full-time schedules allow it.

Dames' Chicken Veronique is an evolution of one of the recipes she used to make for the church suppers.

"People think you slaved forever, but it's actually pretty easy, and it scales well," Dames says. "Just be sure not to
overcook the grapes."



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